Guide to flammable products and ignition sources for elementary schools
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Guide to flammable products and ignition sources for elementary schools

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Published by U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Fire extinction -- United States -- Safety measures,
  • Flammable materials -- Safety measures,
  • Combustion,
  • Elementary schools -- United States -- Fires and fire prevention

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsU.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission
The Physical Object
Paginationv, 26 p. :
Number of Pages26
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14659530M

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This guide is intended as a resource manual and activity sourcebook for elementary school teachers, librarians, administrators, curriculum planners, and teacher educators for teaching proper methods for selecting, using, maintaining, and disposing of flammable products and ignition sources. Basic product safety messages are developed for. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission: A Guide to flammable products and ignition sources for elementary schools. (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, ) (page images at HathiTrust) U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission: A guide to flammable products and ignition sources for elementary schools. Most flammable liquid vapors are heavier than air. These vapors can travel some distance and encounter ignition sources remote from the workstation. If you have questions concerning the applicability of any item listed in this procedure contact Risk Management and Safety at , or the Principal Investigator of your laboratory. PN Version 3 last updated January – A guide for flammable and combustible liquids under the WHS Act Page 6 of 18 AS provides further conditions in the definition of flammable and combustible liquid for the purposes of clarifying the standard’s scope and application. Refer to AS () for further information.

FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS AS A FIRE HAZARD IN SCHOOLS. Flammable liquids have been linked to approximately 25% of all accidental fires in schools. Flammable liquids are those liquids having a flash point less than degrees F or degrees C.. Flammables can be found in many locations throughout a school including: art rooms, science labs, home economics labs, industrial arts shops, . A Guide to flammable products and ignition sources for elementary schools. (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, ), by U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (page images at HathiTrust). Not more than 60 gallons in a flammable storage cabinet. Not more than 3 flammable storage cabinets per fire area. 2. In addition to the gallons as stated above, a maximum of 60 gallons of combustible liquids with a flash point greater than or equal to ° F can . The flammable range is bounded by the Lower Flammable Limit (LFL) and the Upper Flammable Limit (UFL). The LFL is the minimum concentration of flammable liquid vapor in air that will support the propagation of flame, or spread of flame through the entire volume of vapor-air mixture, upon contact with an ignition source. The UFL is the maximum.

Oct 22,  · Sources of Ignition: Flammability Characteristics of Chemicals and Products describes the flammability characteristics of substances and deals with the different sources of ignition. Case histories are presented for review and analysis. The book Book Edition: 1. Keep flammable liquids away from ignition sources such as open flames, sparks, smoking, cutting, welding, etc. Slide 23 (of 23) Summary The two primary hazards associated with flammable and combustible liquids are explosion and fire Safe handling and storage of flammable liquids requires the. If vapours from flammable liquids or gases escape and build up this can cause an explosion, therefore if you are storing large quantities of these, you’ll need to make sure there is a constant flow of air to diffuse any vapours. Heat and ignition sources should not be present. Fires can start from something as simple as a tiny spark. Common. A good plan for safe use of flammable and combustible liquids contains at least these components: Control of the ignition sources. Practice safe handling, storage, fire control and ventilation. Identify sources of ignition. Always use bonding and grounding .